Learning Standards for English Language Arts at Three Levels

 

Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

As listeners and readers, students will collect data, facts, and ideas; discover relationships, concepts, and generalizations; and use knowledge generated from oral, written, and electronically produced texts. As speakers and writers, they will use oral and written language to acquire, interpret, apply, and transmit information.

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression.

Students will read and listen to oral, written, and electronically produced texts and performances, relate texts and performances to their own lives, and develop an understanding of the diverse social, historical, and cultural dimensions the texts and performances represent. As speakers and writers, students will use oral and written language for self-expression and artistic creation.

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

As listeners and readers, students will analyze experiences, ideas, information, and issues presented by others using a variety of established criteria. As speakers and writers, they will present, in oral and written language and from a variety of perspectives, their opinions and judgments on experiences, ideas, information and issues.

Standard 4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

Students will use oral and written language for effective social communication with a wide variety of people. As readers and listeners, they will use the social communications of others to enrich their understanding of people and their views.

 

 

 

Standard 1-Language for Information and Understanding         -Elementary

Listening and Reading Speaking and Writing
1. Listening and reading to acquire information and understanding involves collecting data, facts, and ideas; discovering relationships, concepts, and generalizations; and using knowledge from oral, written, and electronic sources.

Students:

  • gather and Interpret Information from children’s reference books, magazines, textbooks, electronic bulletin boards, audio and media presentations, oral Interviews, and from such forms as charts, graphs, maps, end diagrams
  • select Information appropriate to the purpose of their Investigation and relate Ideas from one text to another
  • select and use strategies they have been taught for note taking, organizing and categorizing Information
  • ask specific questions to clarify and extend meaning
  • make appropriate and effective use of strategies to construct meaning from print, such as prior knowledge about a subject, structural and context clues, and an understanding of letter-sound relationships to decode difficult words
  • support inference about Information and Ideas with reference to text features, such as vocabulary and organizational patterns.

This is evident, for example when students:

  • accurately paraphrase what they have heard or read
  • follow directions that involve a few steps
  • ask for clarification of a classmate’s idea in a group discussion
  • use concept maps, semantic webs, or outlines to organize information they have collected
2. Speaking and writing to acquire and transmit information requires asking probing and clarifying questions, interpreting information in one’s own words, applying information from one context to another, and presenting the information and interpretation clearly, concisely, and comprehensibly.

Students:

  • present Information clearly in a variety of oral and written forms such as summaries, paraphrases, brief reports, stories, posters, and charts
  • select a focus, organization, and point of view for oral and written presentations
  • use a few traditional structures for conveying Information such as chronological order, cause and effect, and similarity and difference
  • use details, examples, anecdotes, or personal experiences to explain or clarify Information
  • include relevant information end exclude extraneous material
  • use the process of pre-writing, drafting, revising and proofreading ( the "writing process") to produce well-constructed Informational texts
  • observe basic writing conventions, such as correct spelling punctuation, and capitalization, as well as sentence and paragraph structures appropriate to written form.,

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • write a short report on a topic in social studies using information from at least two different sources
  • demonstrate the procedures for caring for a classroom pet using props or other visual aids as well as oral explanation
  • revise early drafts of a report to make the information clearer to the audience
  • use the vocabulary from their content area reading appropriately and with correct spelling
  • produce brief summaries of chapters from text books, clearly indicating the most significant information and the reason for its Importance.

 

Standard 1-Language for Information and Understanding         -Intermediate

Listening and Reading Speaking and Writing
1. Listening and reading to acquire information and understanding involves collecting data, facts, and ideas; discovering relationships, concepts, and generalizations; and using knowledge from oral, written, and electronic sources.

Students:

  • interpret and analyze Information from textbooks and nonfiction books for young adults, as well as reference materials, audio and media presentations, oral interviews, graphs, charts, diagrams, and electronic data bases intended for a general audience
  • compare and synthesize information from different sources
  • use a wide variety of strategies for selecting organizing, and categorizing information
  • distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information and between fact and opinion
  • relate new Information to prior knowledge and experience
  • understand and use the text features that make information accessible and usable, such as format,
  • sequence, level of diction, and relevance of details.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • produce a summary of the information about a famous person found in a biography, encyclopedia, and textbook
  • use facts and date from news articles and television reports in
  • an oral report on a current event
  • compile a bibliography of sources that are used in a research project
  • take notes that record the main ideas and most significant supporting details of a lecture or speech.
2. Speaking and writing to acquire and transmit information requires asking probing and clarifying questions, interpreting information in one’s own words, applying information from one context to another, and presenting the information and interpretation clearly concisely, and comprehensibly.

Students:

  • produce oral and written reports on topics related to all school subjects
  • establish an authoritative stance on the subject and provide reference to establish the validity and verifiability of the information presented
  • organize information according to an identifiable structure, such as compare/contrast or general to specific
  • develop information with appropriate supporting material, such as facts, details, illustrative examples or antidotes, and exclude extraneous material
  • use the process of pro-writing drafting, revising and proofreading ( the "writing process") to produce well-
  • constructed informational texts
  • use standard English for formal presentation of information, selecting appropriate grammatical constructions and vocabulary, using a variety of sentence structures, and observing the rules of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling.

This is evident, for example when students:

  • write an essay for science class that contains information from interviews, data bases, magazines, and science texts
  • participate in a panel discussion on population trends in the United States in recent years, using graphics, and citing the source of the data
  • use technical terms correctly in subject area reports
  • survey student views on a school issue and report findings to the class

 

Standard 1-Language for Information and Understanding         -Commencement

Listening and Reading Speaking and Writing
1. Listening and reading to acquire information and understanding involves collecting data, facts, and ideas; discovering relationships, concepts, and generalizations; and using knowledge from oral written, and electronic sources.

Students:

  • interpret and analyze complex informational texts and presentations, including technical manuals, professional journals, newspaper and broadcast editorials, electronic networks, political speeches and debates, and primary source material In their subject area courses
  • synthesize information from diverse sources and identify complexities and discrepancies in the information
  • use a combination of techniques (e.g., previewing use of advance organizers, structural cues) to extract salient information from texts
  • make distinctions about the relative value and significance of specific data, facts, and ideas
  • make perceptive and well developed connections to prior knowledge
  • evaluate writing strategies and presentational features that affect interpretation of the Information.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • incorporate information from several noted experts to support a thesis in a research paper
  • assemble notes for historical and artistic exhibits
  • use an electronic data base and other graphic presentations to find evidence of trends for a sociological study
  • produce flow charts and diagrams to show the relationships among information from different sources
  • determine the relative value of different reference materials for a particular research question.
2. Speaking and writing to acquire and transmit information requires asking probing and clarifying questions, interpreting information in one’s own words, applying information from one context to another, and presenting the information and interpretation clearly, concisely, and comprehensibly.

Students:

  • write and present research reports, feature articles, and thesis/support papers on a variety of topics related to all school subjects
  • present a controlling Idea that conveys an individual perspective and insight into the topic
  • use a wide range of organizational patterns such as chronological, logical (both deductive and Inductive), cause and effect, and comparison/contrast
  • support Interpretations and decisions about relative significance of information with explicit statement, evidence, and appropriate argument
  • revise and improve early drafts by restructuring, correcting errors, and revising for clarity and effect
  • use standard English skillfully, applying established rules and conventions for presenting Information and making use of a wide range of grammatical constructions end vocabulary to achieve an individual style that communicates effectively.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • demonstrate how to perform an intricate task, such as how to operate a computer program or conduct a laboratory experiment
  • write an extended research report on a complex issue or topic that documents sources of information and is well organized to convey overarching ideas and supporting evidence and details
  • write a report of a scientific inquiry that observes the conventions of scientific writing, the rules of evidence, and the correct usage of technical terms
  • produce program notes for an art exhibit or concert with background information on the works and artists.

 

Standard 2-Language for Literary Response and Expression         -Elementary

Listening and Reading Speaking and Writing
1. Listening and reading for literary response involves comprehending, interpreting, and critiquing imaginative texts in every medium, drawing on personal experiences and knowledge to understand the text, and recognizing the social, historical and cultural features of the text.

Students:

  • read a variety of literature of different genres: picture books; poems; articles and stories from children’s magazines; fables, myths and legends; song., plays and media productions; and works of fiction and nonfiction intended for young readers
  • recognize some features that distinguish the genres and use those features to aid comprehension
  • understand the literary elements of setting, character, plot, theme, and point of view and compare those features to other works and to their own lives
  • use Inference and deduction to understand the text
  • read aloud accurately and fluently, using phonics and context cues to determine pronunciation and meaning
  • evaluate literary merit.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • read a picture book to the class and point out how the pictures add meaning to the story
  • recite a favorite poem from a class anthology and tell why they chose that poem
  • keep a reading inventory to show all the types of literature they are reading
  • retell a familiar fairy tale or fable to the class A choose books to read individually or with others.
2. Speaking and writing for literary response involves presenting interpretations, analyses, and reactions to the content and language of a text. Speaking and writing for literary expression involves producing imaginative texts that use language and text structures that are inventive and often mullet layered.

Students:

  • present personal responses to literature that make reference to the plot, characters, ideas, vocabulary and text structure
  • explain the meaning of literary works with some attention to meanings beyond the literal level
  • create their own stories, poems, and song. using the elements of the literature they have read and appropriate vocabulary
  • observe the conventions of grammar and usage, spelling, and punctuation.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • perform dramatic readings or recitations of stories, poems, or play.
  • write a review of a book to recommend it to their classmates
  • create their own picture books or fables to keep in the classroom library
  • write new endings or sequels to familiar stories
  • pretend to be a character in a historical story and write letters to their classmates about the character’s life.

 

Standard 2-Language for Literary Response and Expression         -Intermediate

Listening and Reading Speaking and Writing
1. Listening and reading for literary response involves comprehending, interpreting, and critiquing imaginative texts in every medium, drawing on personal experiences and knowledge to understand the text, and recognizing the social, historical and cultural features of the text.

Students:

  • read and view texts and performances from a wide range of authors, subjects, and genres
  • understand and identify the distinguishing features of the major genres and use them to aid their interpretation and discussion of literature
  • identify significant literary elements (including metaphor, symbolism, foreshadowing, dialect, rhyme, meter, irony, climax) and use those elements to interpret the work
  • recognize different levels of meaning
  • read aloud with expression, conveying the meaning and mood of a work
  • evaluate literary merit based on an understanding of the genre and the literary elements.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • read or recite poems of their own selection to the class, clearly conveying the meaning of the poem and the effect of the rhythm and rhyme patterns
  • produce lists of recommended readings for their peers, grouping the works according to some common elements (e.g., theme, setting, type of characters)
  • use references to literature they have read to support their position in class discussion.
2. Speaking and writing for literary response Involves presenting interpretations, analyses, and reactions to the content and language of a text. Speaking and writing for literary expression involves producing imaginative texts that use language, and text structures that are inventive and often multilayered.

Students:

  • present responses to and interpretations of literature, making reference to the literary elements found in the text and connections with their personal knowledge and experience
  • produce interpretations of literary works that identify different levels of meaning and comment on their significance and effect
  • write stories, poems, literary essays, and plays that observe the conventions of the genre and contain interesting and effective language and voice
  • use standard English effectively.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • take part in class productions of short plays
  • write a sequel to a story continuing the development of the characters, plot, and themes
  • write reviews of literature from different cultural settings and point out similarities and differences in that literature
  • write stories or poems for their peers or younger children

 

Standard 2-Language for Literary Response and Expression         -Commencement

Speaking and Listening Speaking and Writing
1. Listening and reading for literary response involves comprehending, Interpreting, and critiquing imaginative texts in every medium, drawing on personal experiences and knowledge to understand the text, and recognizing the social, historical and cultural features of the text.

Students.

  • read and view independently and fluently across many genres of literature frees many cultures and historical periods
  • identify the distinguishing features of different literary genres, periods and traditions and use those features to interpret the work
  • recognize and understand the significance of a wide range of literary elements and techniques, (including figurative language, imagery allegory irons blank verse, symbolism, stream-of-consciousness) and use those elements to interpret the work
  • understand how multiple levels of meaning are conveyed in a text
  • read aloud expressively to convey a clear interpretation of the work
  • evaluate literary merit based on an understanding of the genre, the literary elements, and the literary period and tradition,

This is evident for example, when students:

  • read a selection of poems of different forms, including sonnets, lyrics, elegies, narrative poem., and odes, end recognize the effect of the structure and form on the meaning
  • act out scenes from a full length play in class
  • read literary pieces on a common theme from several literary periods (such as Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Romantic, Realistic, Naturalistic, and Contemporary) and compare the treatments of the theme in those periods
  • read and interpret works of recognized literary merit from several world cultures and recognize the distinguishing features of those cultural traditions
  • view stage or film productions of a major play or novel and discuss the interpretation of the work that is evident in the production.
2. Speaking and writing for literary response involves presenting interpretations, analyze., and reactions to the content and language of a text. Speaking and writing for literary expression involves producing imaginative texts that use language and text structures that are inventive and often multilayered.

Students

present responses to and interpretations of works of recognized literary merit with references to the principal features of the genre, the period, and literary tradition, and drawing on their personal experiences and knowledge

produce literary interpretations that explicate the multiple layers of meaning

write original pieces ins variety of literary forms, correctly using the conventions of the genre and using structure and vocabulary to achieve an effect

use standard English skillfully and with an individual style.

This is evident, for example when students:

write stories or poems using such literary structures and devices as stanzas and chapters, metaphors, foreshadowing, symbolism, and different forms of dialogue and narration

take part in productions of full length plays?j A put together a collection of literature from different cultures –around a common theme and write the introduction to the collection explaining the similarities and differences

write an interpretation of a major nineteenth-century novel discussing the features of the novel that reflect the conventions of the genre in that time period.

write interpretations of works of recognized literary merit including a discussion of the principal features of the genre, the period, and the tradition.

 

Standard 3-Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation         -Elementary

Listening and Reading Speaking and Writing
1. Listening and reading to analyze and evaluate experiences, ideas, information, and issues requires using evaluative criteria from a variety of perspectives and recognizing the difference in evaluations based on different sets of criteria.

Students:

  • read and form opinions about a variety of literary and Informational texts and presentations, as well as persuasive texts such as advertisements, commercials, and letters to the editor
  • make decision. about the quality and dependability of texts and experiences based on some criteria, such as the attractiveness of the illustrations and appeal of the characters In a picture book, or the logic and believability of the claims made In an advertisement
  • recognize that the criteria that one uses to analyze and evaluate anything depend on one’s point of view and purpose for the analysis
  • evaluate their own strategies for reading and listening critically (such as recognizing bias or false claims, and understanding the difference between fact and opinion) and adjust those strategies to understand the experience more fully.

This is evident, for example when students:

  • of the to a book talk in class and express an opinion of the book with specific reference to the text and to some criteria for a good book
  • read several versions of a familiar fairy tale and recognize the differences in the versions
  • point out examples of false advertising in television ads for toys
  • identify the facts and opinions in a feature article in a children’s magazine.
2. Speaking and writing for critical analysis and evaluation requires presenting opinions and judgments on experiences, ideas, information, and issues clearly, logically, and persuasively with reference to specific criteria on which the opinion or judgment is based.

Students:

  • express opinions (in such forms as oral and written reviews, letters to the editor, essays, or persuasive speeches) about events, books, Issues, and experiences, supporting their opinions with some evidence
  • present arguments for certain views or actions with reference to specific criteria that support the argument (E.g., an argument to purchase a particular piece of playground equipment might be based on the criteria of safety, appeal to children, durability, and low cost.)
  • monitor and adjust their own oral and written presentations to meet criteria for competent performance (E.g., in writing. the criteria might include development of position, organization, appropriate vocabulary mechanics, and neatness. In speaking. the criteria might include good content, effective delivery diction, posture, poise, and eye contact.)
  • use effective vocabulary and follow the rules of grammar, usage, spelling, and punctuation in persuasive writing.

This is evident, for example when students:

  • write a letter to the principal recommending that the school cafeteria serve pizza for lunch based on the criteria that it is nutritious and appealing to students
  • give an oral report comparing several versions of the Cinderella story pointing out similarities and differences in the versions
  • in group discussion, select the most important word of a poem or story and explain its significance
  • write an analysis of the effect of a major snow storm from the perspectives of a school student, a working parent, and a mail carrier
  • in writing group, critique each other’s writing with reference to specific criteria and revise their writing based on the group’s suggestions

 

Standard 3-Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation         -Intermediate

Listening and Reading Speaking and Writing
1. Listening and reading to analyze and evaluate experiences, ideas, information, and issues requires using evaluative criteria from a variety of perspectives and recognizing the difference in evaluations based on different sets of criteria.

Students:

  • analyze, interpret, and evaluate Information, Ideas, organization, and language from academic and nonacademic texts, such as textbooks, public documents, book and movie reviews, and editorials
  • assess the quality of texts and presentations, using criteria related to the genre, the subject area, and purpose (e.g., using the criteria of accuracy objectivity comprehensiveness, and understanding of the game to evaluate a sports editorial)
  • understand that within any group there are many different points of view depending on the particular interests and values of the individual, and recognize those differences in perspective in texts and presentations ?(E.g., in considering whether to let a new industry come into a community, some ?community members might be enthusiastic about the additional jobs that will be created while others are concerned about the air and noise pollution that could result.)
  • evaluate their own and others’ work based on a variety of criteria (e.g., logic, clarity comprehensiveness, conciseness, originality conventionality) and recognize the varying effectiveness of different approaches.

This is evident, for example when students:

  • compare a magazine article on a historical event with the entries in an encyclopedia and history book to determine the accuracy and comprehensiveness of the article
  • use the criteria of scientific investigation to evaluate the significance of a lab experiment
  • read two conflicting reviews of a popular movie and recognize the different criteria the critics were using to evaluate the film
  • point out examples of propaganda techniques (such as bandwagon plain folks" language, and sweeping generalities") in public documents and speeches.
2. Speaking and writing for critical analysis and evaluation requires presenting opinions and judgments on experiences, ideas, information, and issues clearly, logically and persuasively with reference to specific criteria on which the opinion or judgment is based.

Students

  • present (in essays, position papers, speeches, and debates) clear analyses of issues, ideas, texts, and experiences, supporting their positions with well. developed arguments
  • develop arguments with effective use of details and
  • evidence that reflect a coherent set of criteria (e.g.,
  • reporting results of lab experiments to support a hypothesis)
  • monitor and adjust their own oral and written presentations according to the standards for a particular genre (e.g., defining key terms used in a formal debate)
  • use standard English precise vocabulary and presentational strategies effectively to influence an audience.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • write a position paper on a current event, clearly indicating their position and the criteria on which it is based
  • present an oral review of a film, supporting their evaluation with reference to particular elements such as character development, plot, pacing, and cinematography
  • participate in a class debate on a social issue following the rules far formal debate
  • produce their own advertising for a product, tailoring the text and visuals to a particular audience

 

Standard 3-Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation         -Commencement

Listening and Reading Speaking and Writing
1. Listening and reading to analyze and evaluate experiences, ideas, information, and issues requires using evaluative criteria from a variety of perspectives and recognizing the difference in evaluations based on different sets of criteria.

Students:

  • analyze, interpret, and evaluate Ideas, information, organization, and language of a wide range of general and technical texts and presentations across subject areas, including technical manuals, professional journals, political speeches, and literary criticism
  • evaluate the quality of the texts and presentations from a variety of critical perspectives within the field of study (e.g., using both Poe’s elements of a short story and the elements of "naturalist fiction" to evaluate a modern story)
  • make precise determinations about the perspective of a particular writer or speaker by recognizing the relative weight they place on particular arguments and criteria (E.g., one critic condemns a biography as too long and rambling another praises It for Its accuracy and never mentions its length)
  • evaluate and compare their own and others’ work with regard to different criteria and recognize the change in evaluations when different criteria are considered to be more Important.

This is evident, for example when students:

  • compare the majority decision and the dissenting opinions on a Supreme Court case
  • listen to speeches of two political candidates and compare their stands on several major issues
  • read the writing of several critics on the same author and determine what literary criteria each used in evaluating the author and how that accounts for different judgments
  • read a current article on a scientific issue, such as the greenhouse effect, and compare it to an earlier explanation of the same issue.
2. Speaking and writing for critical analysis and evaluation requires presenting opinions and judgments on experiences, ideas, information, and issues clearly, logically, and persuasively with reference to specific criteria on which the opinion or judgment is based.

Students:

  • present orally and In writing well developed analyses of issues, ideas, and texts, explaining the rationale for their positions and analyzing their positions from a variety of perspectives in such forms as formal speeches, debates, thesis/support papers, literary critiques, and issues analyses
  • make effective use of details, evidence, and arguments and of presentational strategies to Influence an audience to adopt their position
  • monitor and adjust their own oral and written presentations to have the greatest influence on a particular audience
  • use standard English a broad and precise vocabulary and the conventions of formal oratory and debate.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • write two different analyses of a Supreme Court decision from the perspectives of a "strict-constructionist"" and a judicial activist
  • write a review of a technical manual from the perspective of current industry standards
  • deliver a "campaign" speech using a variety of persuasive strategies to influence an audience
  • write an essay comparing critiques from two different centuries of a Shakespearean play.

 

Standard 4-Language for Social Interaction         -Elementary

Listening and Speaking Reading and Writing
1. Oral communication in formal and Informal settings requires the ability to talk with people of different ages, genders, and cultures, to adapt presentations to different audiences, and to reflect on how talk varies in different situations.

Students,

  • listen attentively and recognize when It is appropriate for them to speak
  • take turns speaking and respond to others’ ideas in conversations on familiar topics
  • recognize the kind of interaction appropriate for different circumstances such as story hour, group discussions, and one-on-one conversations.

this is evident, for example when students:

  • take part in "show and tell" sessions
  • participate in group discussions during "circle time"
  • greet visitors to their school or classroom and respond to their questions
  • bring messages to the principal’s office or to another teacher.
2. Written communication for social Interaction requires using written messages to establish, maintain, and enhance personal relationships with others.

Students,

  • exchange friendly notes, cards, and letters with friends, relatives, and pen pals to keep in touch end to commemorate special occasions
  • adjust their vocabulary and style to take into account the nature of the relationship and the knowledge and interests of the person receiving the message
  • read and discuss published letters, diaries, and Journals to learn the conventions of social writing.

This is evident, for example when students:

  • write thank you notes and invitations to friends
  • exchange letters with pen pals in another country
  • write letters to relatives who live in another city.
  • Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction.

 

Standard 4- Language for Social Interaction         -Intermediate

Listening and Speaking Reading and Writing
1. Oral communication in formal and Informal settings requires the ability to talk with people of different ages, genders, and cultures, to adapt presentations to different audiences, and to reflect on how talk varies in different situations.

Students:

  • listen attentively to others and build on others’ Ideas in conversations with peers and adults
  • express Ideas and concerns clearly and respectfully in conversations and group discussions
  • learn some words and expressions in another language to communicate with a peer or adult who speaks that language.
  • use verbal and nonverbal skills to Improve communication with others.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • act as hosts for open house at school
  • participate in small group discussions in class
  • give morning announcements over the public address system
  • participate in school assemblies and club meetings.
  • Reading and Writing
2. Written communication for social interaction requires using written messages to establish, maintain, and enhance personal relationships with others.

Students,

  • write social letters, cards, and electronic messages to friends, relatives, community acquaintances, and other electronic network users
  • use appropriate language and style for the situation and the audience and take into account the ideas and inter-eats expressed by the person receiving the message
  • read and discuss social communications and electronic communications of other writers and use some of the techniques of those writers in their own writing.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • write letters to friends who are away
  • send e-mail messages on a computer network
  • send formal invitations for receptions or open houses

Standard 4- Language for Social Interaction         -Commencement

Listening and Speaking Reading and Writing
1. Oral communication in formal and Informal settings requires the ability to talk with people of different ages, genders, and cultures, to adapt presentations to different audiences, and to reflect on how talk varies in different situations.

Students:

  • engage in conversations and discussions on academic, technical, and community subjects, anticipating
  • listeners’ needs and skillfully addressing them
  • express their thoughts and views clearly with attention to the perspectives and voiced concerns of the others in
  • the conversation
  • use appropriately the language conventions for a wide variety of social situations, such as informal conversations, first meetings with peers or adults, and more formal situations such as Job interviews or customer services.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • take part in and conduct meetings of student organizations
  • interact with community members through community service
  • experience or part-time jobs
  • interview for a job or college acceptance
  • great visitors at school performances or sports banquets.
Written communication for social interaction requires using written messages to establish, maintain, and enhance personal relationships with others.

Students:

  • use a variety of print and electronic forms for social communication with peers and adults
  • make effective use of language and style to connect the message with the audience and context
  • study the social conventions and language conventions of writers from other groups and cultures and use those conventions to communicate with members of those groups.

This is evident, for example, when students:

  • participate in electronic discussion groups (e.g., listserv)
  • write letters and personal essays as part of college application
  • write personal notes and letters that entertain and interest the recipient